Restricted Region

These trekking areas are different in many features from ordinary onesc You must travel with a liaison officer and pay for a special permit. Groups must consist of a minimum of two clients and the required staffs. The main objective of declaring these areas ' restricted' is to protect the natural environment and culture from outside influences.

A number of the remote areas of Nepal were restricted for foreign visitors until 1991 where the entry of foreigners is strictly controlled. These trekking areas are different in many features from ordinary ones. Many treks that may be suggested on a map are in restricted areas and you either can not get a permit for these areas. You must travel with a liaison officer and pay for a special permit. Groups must consist of a minimum of two clients and the required staffs. The main objective of declaring these areas ' restricted' is to protect the natural environment and culture from outside influences. The environmental officer has to handle all the formalities with the police and government offices in route. The treks must be fully arranged through registered Trekking Company. It has to be fully equipped with tent, all Support staffs, cooks, etc. The trekking agency arranges the trekking permit through a series of applications and guarantees letters. You cannot trek along in the restricted area.

Fees for treks to restricted areas range from US$70 per day (with a 10 day minimum) for Mustang to US$90 per week for Humla and Manaslu. You must also pay for a Nepal government official to accompany you throughout the trek.

Permits & Formalities

A trek to a restricted area must be arranged as a fully equipped organised trek through a registered trekking agency using tents, sherpa staff, cooks and porters. The trekking agency arranges the permit through a series of applications, guarantees and letters, a process that requires about two weeks and can be started only 21 days before the arrival of the group. You may not trek alone; there must be at least two trekkers in each group. For some areas there is a limit to the number of trekkers per season. There is no system of advance reservation, and no clear indication of what will happen if the quota is reached the day before you make an application.

Each group is assigned an "environmental officer" who will accompany it during the trek. Despite the fancy name, what you will get is a Nepalese policeman who you must equip, insure and take on the trek. The liaison officer is supposed to handle all the formalities with police and government offices en route.

Fixed Departures

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